Thursday, May 6, 2021

Good Morning Baby Birds

The trills and trickles of song from the birds in the big tree above her seemed in perfect accord with her mood. ~L.M. Montgomery, 1915

Robins tend to lay two or three eggs at the most in their nest.  Sometimes, while mother is away, another bird lays her eggs in the very same nest.  Whether or not the first mother bird frightened away the second mother bird or perhaps it was the other way around...  we have a nest of blended baby birds.  You can see that the bigger babies have feathers and beaks.  The younger ones are pinkish and featherless.  Hatched but not "awake" yet.

It is rather a strange sight.  I hope the bigger babies don't eat the smaller ones.  Have you seen this mixture of eggs before?  It is a first for me.

Tucker Update - we will be picking him up Saturday morning!

6 comments:

  1. It could be a cuckoo, famous for ousting baby birds and taking over.

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    1. Barbara, I'm not sure what cuckoo eggs look like. My husband said the eggs all looked the same so who knows!

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  2. oh wow, that is interesting that there are two types of birds, will be curious how they get along.
    Bet you're excited to get Tucker tomorrow!

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    1. Connie, I will post pictures soon. My guess is the older ones will leave the nest sooner than the others.

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  3. I have heard of a mixed nest before, but have never seen a picture of it. Thank you for sharing, Gina! I know you are excited about picking up Tucker and bringing him home.

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    1. Robin, I am still excited even though we brought him home Saturday. ♥

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